Animated Film Adaptation of Deborah Ellis’s Bestselling The Breadwinner Nominated for an Academy Award for Animated Feature Film

The Breadwinner Groundwood Books

Groundwood Books is proud to announce that the full-length animated adaptation of The Breadwinner has been nominated for an Academy Award® for Animated Feature Film. The film is based on Deborah Ellis’s internationally bestselling novel of the same name.

“We couldn’t be more delighted that this beautiful film, based on Deb Ellis’s story of a young girl who must be brave enough to look after her family, is being given the recognition it deserves by the Academy. It is especially important at this time when stories about girls are finally being celebrated,” said Barbara Howson, Vice President of Sales and Licensing at Groundwood Books. 

The Breadwinner tells the story of eleven-year-old Parvana, who lives in Kabul. Forbidden to earn money as a girl, Parvana must disguise herself as a boy and become the breadwinner for her family. First published in 2000, The Breadwinner is the first book in the four-part award-winning Breadwinner series about loyalty, survival, family and friendship under extraordinary circumstances during the Taliban’s rule in Afghanistan. The series has sold over two million copies worldwide and has been published in twenty-five languages. A movie tie-in edition and a graphic-novel adaptation of The Breadwinner are now available in stores. 

“Stories that celebrate the determination and strength of girls, like Parvana in The Breadwinner, are needed now more than ever. We thank the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences for shining a light on this timely and important film,” said Andrew Rosen, producer with Aircraft Pictures. 

The Breadwinner film was directed by Nora Twomey of Cartoon Saloon. It was produced by Aircraft Pictures, Cartoon Saloon and Melusine Productions, with producers Tomm Moore and Paul Young of Cartoon Saloon, Anthony Leo and Andrew Rosen of Aircraft Pictures, and Stéphan Roelants of Melusine Productions. The film was executive produced by Jolie Pas Productions.

The Breadwinner has been a labour of love for Aircraft Pictures since we first connected with Deborah Ellis to adapt her inspiring novel for the screen. We’re so grateful to our visionary director Nora Twomey, our co-producing partners, our financiers and the many artists who participated in the film’s creation,” said Anthony Leo, producer with Aircraft Pictures.

The recipients of the 2018 Academy Awards® will be announced on Sunday, March 4, 2018.

Here is a link to the announcement from the Academy Awards® website: https://www.oscars.org/sites/oscars/files/90th_noms_announcement.pdf 

Here is a link to The Breadwinner trailer: http://www.tiff.net/tiff/film.html?v=the-breadwinner

About Deborah Ellis:

Deborah Ellis is an award-winning author and a peace activist. Deborah penned the international bestseller The Breadwinner, as well as many challenging and beautiful works of fiction and non-fiction about children all over the world. Deborah is a passionate advocate for the disenfranchised and has been named to the Order of Ontario, as well as the Order of Canada. She has donated most of her royalty income to worthy causes — Canadian Women for Women in Afghanistan, Street Kids International, the Children in Crisis Fund of IBBY (International Board on Books for Young People) and UNICEF. She has donated almost two million dollars in royalties from her Breadwinner books alone.

About Groundwood Books:

Groundwood Books is an independent children’s publisher based in Toronto. Founded in 1978, the company is now part of House of Anansi Press. Our authors and illustrators are highly acclaimed both in Canada and internationally, and our books are loved by children around the world. We look for books that are unusual; we are not afraid of books that are difficult or potentially controversial; and we are particularly committed to publishing books for and about children whose experiences of the world are under-represented elsewhere.

About Aircraft Pictures:

Aircraft Pictures is an independent scripted-content production company creating quality entertainment for a worldwide audience, ranging from independent feature films to high-end television series. Aircraft has offices in Toronto and Los Angeles.

About Cartoon Saloon:

Cartoon Saloon is a two-time Academy Award® nominee for the 2010 film The Secret of Kells and its 2014 follow-up, Song of the Sea. The studio was formed in 1999 by Paul Young, Tomm Moore and Nora Twomey, and is based in Kilkenny, Ireland. 

About Melusine Productions:

Melusine Productions is based in Luxembourg. They specialize in animated films and documentaries. Recent films include the award-winning Song of the Sea and Extraordinary Tales.

The Breadwinner Cartoon Adaptation Releases New Artwork

We are so excited that the cartoon adaptation of The Breadwinner has gone to production! What better way to celebrate than taking a look at some of the newly released artwork from the film. Thanks to Cartoon Saloon for these fantastic images.

The Breakwinner Adaptation Artwork

The Breakwinner Adaptation Artwork

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The Breakwinner Adaptation Artwork

The Breakwinner Adaptation Artwork


The Breadwinner by Deborah Ellis

The first book in Deborah Ellis’s riveting Breadwinner series is an award-winning novel about loyalty, survival, families and friendship under extraordinary circumstances during the Taliban’s rule in Afghanistan.

Eleven-year-old Parvana lives with her family in one room of a bombed-out apartment building in Kabul, Afghanistan’s capital city. Parvana’s father — a history teacher until his school was bombed and his health destroyed — works from a blanket on the ground in the marketplace, reading letters for people who cannot read or write. One day, he is arrested for the crime of having a foreign education, and the family is left without someone who can earn money or even shop for food.

As conditions for the family grow desperate, only one solution emerges. Forbidden to earn money as a girl, Parvana must transform herself into a boy, and become the breadwinner.

Enter to win Groundwood Favourites!

Groundwood Favorites Giveaway

We won!

In celebration of being named Best Children’s Publisher of the Year in North America by the Bologna Children’s Book Fair, we’re giving away three of our favourite Groundwood titles:

  1. The Breadwinner by Deborah Ellis
  2. Sidewalk Flowers by JonArno Lawson and Sydney Smith
  3. Any Questions? by Marie-Louise Gay

The contest runs from April 6th to April 20th. A winner will be randomly chosen. Fill out the form below to enter!

Win a complete 15th Anniversary The Breadwinner set!

The Breadwinner Series by Deborah Ellis is a story about loyalty, survival, families and friendship under extraordinary circumstances during the Taliban’s rule in Afghanistan. Since the original release of The Breadwinner in the year 2000, the series has been published in twenty-five languages and has earned more than $1 million in royalties to benefit Canadian Women for Women in Afghanistan and Street Kids International.

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Deborah Ellis AMA Round-up

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On Friday, September 19th, Deborah Ellis hosted a Reddit AMA (ask me anything) session. We want to thank everyone who participated for the wonderful, thought-provoking and even controversial questions centered around feminism, ideology and Deborah’s fantastic novels. For those of you who missed it, we’ve rounded up some key questions from the discussion:

Q.  In your opinion what’s the most progressive welcoming, women equal country based on opportunity and general equality?

A. I’ve heard that Iceland is very good. Women all over the world have talents to bring forward, and the more chances they get, the better their countries become.

Q. I teach The Breadwinner series to my 8th graders, and fell in love with your book Kids of Kabul last year as a read aloud. That book really showed my students how lucky they are just because of where they are from, and that they can do so much to help other kids in this world. What is the biggest thing you have taken away from your experiences with children in Afghanistan? Do you believe that there is hope to return the country to the way is was 60 years ago?

A. There is always hope. If we get off the backs of the young Afghan people by ceasing military interventions and give them the resources they need to rebuild their country.

Q. What does feminism mean to you?

A. Opportunities for women and for everyone to live the life that they want to live.

Q. When writing The Cat at the Wall, did you travel to the West Bank to talk with people about their experiences?

A. Yes, I traveled to many places in the West Bank including Bethlehem, Hebron and Ramallah. I met with young people of all ages in different circumstances. They told me about dealing with the Israeli military and wishing they could make friends with Israeli kids.

Q. Do you have a specific process that you follow for writing a novel?

A. I usually start with a question that I want to answer. What if something happens? Then I try to answer it. For example, what would is it like for children growing up under the Taliban? I wanted to try to understand that, so that’s why I wrote The Breadwinner.

Q. Any movie or book in the world, which one do you wish that you’d written?

A. wish I had written From Anna by Jean Little. It’s a book about a family escaping WWII, but it’s also the story of a little girl trying to figure out who she is. It’s written with simplicity and dignity.

Q. Deborah…you have gifted readers with your amazing insightful stories. The latest one that I have recommended and sold is Moon at Nine. What inspired you as a writer to record the real stories of young people seeking some kind of justice to their predicaments?

A. The book Moon at Nine is about two teenage girls who fall in love in 1988 Iran. It’s based on a true story. I met the woman whose story it was, and she asked me to write it for her because she still has family back in Iran. She couldn’t write it herself because it would put them in danger. I’m drawn to stories of courage because they inspire us to have courage in our own lives.

Q. You seem to travel a great deal. When did you decide to venture beyond Canada and write about the world beyond North America?

A. When the Taliban took over in Afghanistan, I wanted to find out more about what those women were going through and how we could be useful back in Canada. So I spent time in the Afghan refugee camps in Pakistan meeting with people and hearing their stories. That was the first time I’d ever done anything like that.

Q. What does it feel like to fight for the oppressed and weak? Also, do you think that human’s can ever control their vices like greed, power, and jealousy which lead to evil actions.

A. I’m honoured to be able to meet so many courageous people around the world. About vices, there is a difference between being human and all the things and go with it and making it legal to drop bombs on people in other countries.


20662575Deborah Ellis, best known for her Breadwinner series, has donated more than $1 million in royalties to Canadian Women for Women in Afghanistan and Street Kids International. She has won many awards, including the Governor General’s Award and Sweden’s Peter Pan Prize.

 

Her new novel The Cat at the Wall centers around Clare, a young girl who finds she has been reincarnated as a cat on the West Bank.

 

 

 

Ask Deborah Ellis Anything! Reddit AMA

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With her new book The Cat at the Wall in bookstores now, Deborah Ellis is ready to tell all in her upcoming Reddit AMA (ask me anything) this Friday, September 19th, at 1pm EST.

20662575 The Cat at the Wall follows Clare, an ordinary girl faced with the extraordinary reality of being reincarnated as a cat. She finds herself on the West Bank in a house inhabited by two Israeli soldiers and a small Palestinian boy hiding beneath the floorboards. Like all of Deborah Ellis’ work The Cat at the Wall will spark discussion. It will also inspire readers to imagine the power even simple acts can have.

In a recent interview for the New York Times’ Sunday Book Review, Malala Yousafzai named The Breadwinner by Deborah Ellis as a book she wished all girls would read. Malala said, “I think it’s important for girls everywhere to learn how women are treated in some societies. But even though Parvana is treated as lesser than boys and men, she never feels that way. She believes in herself and is stronger to fight against hunger, fear and war. Girls like her are an inspiration.” Yousafzai’s interview is an inspiring read in itself and brings to light the importance of writers like Ellis, who are unafraid to tackle tough subjects and bring them to the attention of young readers.

978-1-55498-120-5_lIn her recent nonfiction work Looks Like Daylight: Voices of Indigenous Kids, Ellis collected interviews with Indigenous children aged nine to eighteen from across North America and brought their compelling stories into the spotlight. In this book, like her previously acclaimed collections of interviews with Afghan, Iraqi, North American, Israeli, and Palestinian children, Ellis gives children a voice to talk about their cultural identity. It is no surprise that Looks Like Daylight has been announced as a finalist for the 2014 Norma Fleck Award for Canadian Children’s Non-Fiction.

She continues to post gripping interviews on her personal blog with children whose stories she wants to tell. Her piece for The Guardian entitled “How War Changes People” explores identity as a human right, and describes how war has affected children she has met in war-torn nations. In this essay, Deborah asks, “How do we create an identity for ourselves, and communicate it to others, when all we have known gets stripped away? How do we find the core of who we are in times like this without completely losing our minds?”


 

Deborah Ellis wants to answer any creative, honest, and provocative questions you might have. On Friday, September 19th, sign up for an account on Reddit.com and participate in the AMA session.

DEBORAH ELLIS REDDIT AMA – Friday, September 19th, at 1pm EST

Deb Ellis AMA (dragged)

Joy in the Storm – An Open Letter From Deborah Ellis to the Gaza Strip

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The on-going conflict between Israel and Palestine ebbs and flows in intensity and cruelty. The hardships for children come in the form of bombs from the sky, rocks thrown at car windows, insults at checkpoints and never being sure that the calm of the moment will stretch into the evening.

Kids around the world try to make the best of whatever situation the adult world throws them into. I’ve met kids in refugee camps in Pakistan who make kites from string tied to plastic shopping bags, kids in Zambia who make toys from old tins they find on rubbish tips and kids in prison in Russia who make bracelets from strings torn from their blankets.

The last time I was in Israel and Palestine, in January of 2013, I asked kids what they do to keep themselves feeling as good as possible while the adults around them serve up chaos on a platter for breakfast, lunch and supper.

Yael, a 12 year old Orthodox Jewish boy living in Sderot, next to the Gaza Strip, told me that when the Palestinian bombs rain down on his town, he goes into a shelter and sings psalms, and that helps him feel not so afraid.

A 14 year old Palestinian boy in the southern part of the Gaza Strip told me, “Sometimes we will be out playing football and we’ll hear that the bombs are coming again and we’ll just keep playing. Playing football gives us hope. If we are going to die, we might as well die doing something we love.”

Yaffa, who is nine, is a girl from the Druze community living in the Golan Heights, smack up against the buffer zone between Israel and Syria. She has witnessed large-scale disturbances from refugees breaking through the border and deals with a constant military presence in her town. She chooses to focus on collecting rocks and looking for frogs.

Jabor, a thirteen year old Israeli Arab in Haifa likes to watch Mr. Bean movies when he gets sad, and Jehad, 12, loves to spend time in the children’s library in Ramallah.

All of these children have joys and aspirations that have nothing to do with killing anyone. If left to shape the world on their own, they would make art, play sports, enjoy the natural world and build friendships – all excellent pursuits that would have a lasting positive impact on the world they are going to take over from us.

I wonder what it will take for us to get out of their way and let them get to it.


deb2Deborah Ellis is the author of over twenty beautiful, thought provoking books for young people, including The Breadwinner Trilogy, which has won several literary awards. In her latest work of fiction, The Cat at the Wall, the conflict at the West Bank is told through the eyes of Clare, a young girl who finds herself reincarnated as a cat.

Join Deborah Ellis for a Reddit AMA on Friday, September 19th, at 1pm EST, for a chance to ask her any and all earnest, honest, and provocative questions.

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