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Groundwood Publishes Very Good Books

Holiday season is upon us, and the Anansi Elves have been hard at work! Visit houseofanansi.com to find great deals (and gift packages!) throughout the holiday season! (Don’t miss out on the Buddy & Earl Gift Pack, or the Groundwood Gift Wrap!) Happy holidays from everyone at House of Anansi Press and Groundwood Books!

The White Cat and the Monk named a Best Illustrated book by the New York Times!

White Cat & the Monk

Last year Sidewalk Flowers by JonArno Lawson and illustrator Sydney Smith was named a Best Illustrated Children’s Book by The New York Times Book Review… and one year later Sydney Smith is back on the list! The White Cat and the Monk by Jo Ellen Bogart and Sydney Smith was just named a Best Illustrated Book by the New York Times!

Sydney’s “distinctive art . . . falls partway between modernist fairy tale and graphic novel, opening an inviting portal between past and present,” notes Maria Popova.

Congratulations, Jo Ellen and Sydney!


Groundwood Logos Spine The White Cat and the Monk
Written by Jo Ellen Bogart and illustrated by Sydney Smith

A monk leads a simple life. He studies his books late into the evening and searches for truth in their pages. His cat, Pangur, leads a simple life, too, chasing prey in the darkness. As night turns to dawn, Pangur leads his companion to the truth he has been seeking.

The White Cat and the Monk is a retelling of the classic Old Irish poem “Pangur Bán.” With Jo Ellen Bogart’s simple and elegant narration and Sydney Smith’s classically inspired images, this contemplative story pays tribute to the wisdom of animals and the wonders of the natural world.

 

TWO Groundwood Titles Win #GGBooks Awards!

Governor General’s Literary Awards Winner Calvin by Martine LeavittWe’re thrilled to announce Martine Leavitt’s Calvin has been selected as the winner of the Governor General’s Literary Award in the Young People’s Literature (text) category! Congratulations, Martine!

In Calvin – part romance, part adventure story, part quest novel — Martine Leavitt brings her inimitable gentle wit, humor and compassion to a story about a teenaged boy struggling to gain control of his own mind and destiny.

“In Martine Leavitt’s Calvin, a boy newly diagnosed with schizophrenia makes a pilgrimage across a frozen Lake Erie. Told in spare, beautiful prose, this transcendent exploration of reality and truth is funny, frightening and affirming. Calvin is an astonishing achievement.” — #GGBooks Jury Statement


Governor General’s Literary Awards Winner Tokyo Digs A Garden by Jon-Erik Lappano and Kellen HatanakaBut, it doesn’t stop there… there’s a whole garden’s worth of good news today. Tokyo Digs a Garden by Jon-Erik Lappano and Kellen Hatanaka has won the Governor General’s Literary Award in the Young People’s Literature (illustrated books) category!

Tokyo Digs a Garden marries text and illustration in a richly ornamented dream landscape that simultaneously suggests a digital and an organic world. Kellen Hatanaka’s illustrations are inventive and groundbreaking and the hypnotic text by Jon-Erik Lappano conveys its message in a darkly humourous and elegant manner. A book for any age.” — #GGBooks Jury Statement

Congratulations, Jon-Erik and Kellen!


About Calvin

In the town of Leamington, Ontario, a seventeen-year-old boy is suddenly stricken by a schizophrenic episode and wakes up in hospital. The boy’s name is Calvin, and he is plagued by hallucinations.

As the hallucinations persist, Calvin comes to believe that the answer lies in performing one grand and incredible gesture.

And so he decides to walk across Lake Erie. In January. The temperatures have been below freezing for weeks. The ice should hold…

The lake, it turns out, is more marvelous, and more treacherous, than Calvin had ever imagined — populated by abandoned cars (joy ride!), ice-fishing eccentrics, psychokiller snow beings, and a not-so-mythical sea witch named Jenny Greenteeth.

Not to mention the man-eating tiger that looms just out of his sight lines as he treks.

But the biggest surprise of all is that Calvin finds himself accompanied by Susie, the girl of his dreams. Or is it his dreams that have conjured up Susie?

Part romance, part adventure story, part quest novel, Martine Leavitt brings her inimitable gentle wit, humor and compassion to a story about a teenaged boy struggling to gain control of his own mind and destiny.

About Tokyo Digs a Garden

Tokyo lives in a small house between giant buildings with his family and his cat, Kevin. For years, highways and skyscrapers have been built up around the family’s house where once there were hills and trees. Will they ever experience the natural world again?

One day, an old woman offers Tokyo seeds, telling him they will grow into whatever he wishes. Tokyo and his grandfather are astonished when the seeds grow into a forest so lush that it takes over the entire city overnight. Soon the whole city has gone wild, with animals roaming where cars once drove. But is this a problem to be surmounted, or a new way of living to be embraced?

With Tokyo Digs a Garden, Jon-Erik Lappano and Kellen Hatanaka have created a thoughtful and inspiring fable of environmentalism and imagination.

WIN A FLOCK OF BIRD-THEMED BOOKS!

Bird-Themed Books from Groundwood Books

While the majority of our Canadian birds prepare to head South in the near future, we have a trio of bird-themed books that could be headed right to your bookshelf. For this week only, we’re holding a contest in which the winner will receive the following three titles:

The King of the Birds by Acree Graham Macan and Natalie Nelson

My Book of Birds by Geraldo Valério

Loon by Susan Vande Griek and Karen Reczuch

Sidewalk Flowers Now Translated in 15 Different Languages

Sidewalk Flowers, conceived by JonArno Lawson and illustrated by Sydney Smith, has now been translated into fifteen different languages. While impending translations (Simplified Chinese, Farsi and Vietnamese) have yet to arrive at the office, we wrangled together the twelve we had on hand at Groundwood HQ:

ENGLISH (Special Edition for Syrian refugees)
unspecified-1 


CZECH
unspecified-2

 


FRENCH (Québécois)
unspecified-3

 


ENGLISH (UK)
unspecified-4

 


GERMAN
unspecified-5

 


PORTUGUESE
unspecified-6

 


CHINESE (Complex)
unspecified-7

 


JAPANESE
unspecified-8

 


FRENCH (Parisian)
unspecified-9

 


DUTCH
unspecified-10

 


KOREAN
unspecified-11

 


MEXICAN SPANISH
unspecified-12

Spooky Sweepstakes from Groundwood!

spookystuffs

We’re starting to get in the Halloween spirit here at Groundwood, and we thought we’d help you do the same. While the industrial strip of 128 Sterling likely won’t attract any trick-or-treaters, that doesn’t mean that we aren’t going to hook you up with some goodies. Here’s what we have to offer if you enter and win our sweepstakes (and we promise, it’s just as good as candy):

The Elevator Ghost by Glen Huser

What There Is Before There Is Anything There (A Scary Story) by Liniers

Strange Light Afar: Tales of the Supernatural from Old Japan by Rui Umezawa

 


                
            

THREE GROUNDWOOD TITLES SHORTLISTED FOR GOVERNOR GENERAL’S LITERARY AWARDS

groundwoodggs

We’re thrilled to announce that three Groundwood authors have been shortlisted for the 2016 Governor General’s Literary Awards! Congratulations to:

Young People’s Literature Calvin, Martine Leavitt

Young People’s Literature— The White Cat and the Monk, Jo Ellen Bogart and Sydney Smith and Tokyo Digs a Garden, Jon-Erik Lappano and Kellen Hatanaka


9781554987207_hr Calvin
Written by Martine Leavitt

In the town of Leamington, Ontario, a seventeen-year-old boy is suddenly stricken by a schizophrenic episode and wakes up in hospital. The boy’s name is Calvin, and he is plagued by hallucinations.

As the hallucinations persist, Calvin comes to believe that the answer lies in performing one grand and incredible gesture.

And so he decides to walk across Lake Erie. In January. The temperatures have been below freezing for weeks. The ice should hold…

The lake, it turns out, is more marvelous, and more treacherous, than Calvin had ever imagined — populated by abandoned cars (joy ride!), ice-fishing eccentrics, psychokiller snow beings, and a not-so-mythical sea witch named Jenny Greenteeth.

Not to mention the man-eating tiger that looms just out of his sight lines as he treks.

But the biggest surprise of all is that Calvin finds himself accompanied by Susie, the girl of his dreams. Or is it his dreams that have conjured up Susie?

Part romance, part adventure story, part quest novel, Martine Leavitt brings her inimitable gentle wit, humor and compassion to a story about a teenaged boy struggling to gain control of his own mind and destiny.


Groundwood Logos Spine The White Cat and the Monk
Written by Jo Ellen Bogart and illustrated by Sydney Smith

A monk leads a simple life. He studies his books late into the evening and searches for truth in their pages. His cat, Pangur, leads a simple life, too, chasing prey in the darkness. As night turns to dawn, Pangur leads his companion to the truth he has been seeking.

The White Cat and the Monk is a retelling of the classic Old Irish poem “Pangur Bán.” With Jo Ellen Bogart’s simple and elegant narration and Sydney Smith’s classically inspired images, this contemplative story pays tribute to the wisdom of animals and the wonders of the natural world.


Groundwood Logos Spine Tokyo Digs a Garden
Written by Jon-Erik Lappano and illustrated by Kellen Hatanaka

Tokyo lives in a small house between giant buildings with his family and his cat, Kevin. For years, highways and skyscrapers have been built up around the family’s house where once there were hills and trees. Will they ever experience the natural world again?

One day, an old woman offers Tokyo seeds, telling him they will grow into whatever he wishes. Tokyo and his grandfather are astonished when the seeds grow into a forest so lush that it takes over the entire city overnight. Soon the whole city has gone wild, with animals roaming where cars once drove. But is this a problem to be surmounted, or a new way of living to be embraced?

With Tokyo Digs a Garden, Jon-Erik Lappano and Kellen Hatanaka have created a thoughtful and inspiring fable of environmentalism and imagination.


New Releases from Groundwood This October

Fall is in full swing—take a break from the pumpkin patch and check out our October releases! All the listed titles are available to order right now from houseofanansi.com.


roostergallo Rooster/Gallo
Written by Jorge Luján, Illustrated by Manuel Monroy, Translated by Elisa Amado
Publishes October 1st

The song of the rooster draws forth the universe and gives way to the dance of beings and objects as day draws its first brilliant breath. Written in Spanish and English, this book is so supremely simple that a baby can delight in it, and yet so complex that an adult reader can find joy in the poem and beautiful images over and over again.

Jorge Luján dreamed this myth and, when he wrote it, understood that the rooster is the poet of the day. Manuel Monroy dipped his pen in the ink of the night and, when he withdrew it, found it was spangled with stars.


snowsummer Snow Summer
Written by Kit Peel
Publishes October 1st

Massive climate change has caused a winter that will not thaw, and it seems that the forces of nature have turned on humanity itself. But in the sleepy British village of Pateley, one special girl may hold the key to the earth’s survival.

Wyn, an orphan, has always known that she is different. Unable to feel the biting cold of wind and snow of Pateley’s endless winter, she does what she can to blend in. But when mysterious figures start to appear in the village, insisting that she may have the power to restore order to the natural world, Wyn must look deep inside herself to face the secrets of her past that she has kept hidden even from herself.

From debut author Kit Peel, Snow Summer is an immersive fantasy novel that expertly conveys the beauty of the natural world and its conflict with human development. A powerful allegory for climate change and global warming, it is nevertheless a timeless story, reminiscent of classics of the genre.


dosconejosblancos Dos conejos blancos
Written by Jairo Buitrago, Illustrated by Rafael Yockteng, Translated by Elisa Amado
Publishes October 1st

In this moving and timely story, a young child describes what it is like to be a migrant as she and her father travel north toward the US border.

They travel mostly on the roof of a train known as The Beast, but the little girl doesn’t know where they are going. She counts the animals by the road, the clouds in the sky, the stars. Sometimes she sees soldiers. She sleeps, dreaming that she is always on the move, although sometimes they are forced to stop and her father has to earn more money before they can continue their journey.

As many thousands of people, especially children, in Mexico and Central America continue to make the arduous journey to the US border in search of a better life, this is an important book that shows a young migrant’s perspective.


Groundwood Logos Spine Friend or Foe?
Written by John Sobol, Illustrated by Dasha Tolstikova
Publishes October 1st

“A lonely mouse lived in a small house beside a great palace. In the great palace lived a cat.”

Each night the mouse gazes up at the cat in the palace tower. Is the cat my friend? he wonders. Determined to find out, he bravely makes his way into the palace through a tiny hole and climbs all the way up to the tower, where the cat sits on the windowsill.

“Hello, are you friend or foe?” he squeaks.

This simple story by John Sobol has a surprising outcome, giving young readers a chance to draw their own conclusions. It is perfectly complemented by Dasha Tolstikova’s subtle yet striking illustrations.


weareliketheclouds Somos Como Las Nubes / We Are Like The Clouds
Written by Jorge Argueta, Illustrated by Alfonso Ruano, Translated by Elisa Amado
Publishes October 1st

Why are young people leaving their country to walk to the United States to seek a new, safe home? Over 100,000 such children have left Central America. This book of poetry helps us to understand why and what it is like to be them.

This powerful book by award-winning Salvadoran poet Jorge Argueta describes the terrible process that leads young people to undertake the extreme hardships and risks involved in the journey to what they hope will be a new life of safety and opportunity. A refugee from El Salvador’s war in the eighties, Argueta was born to explain the tragic choice confronting young Central Americans today who are saying goodbye to everything they know because they fear for their lives. This book brings home their situation and will help young people who are living in safety to understand those who are not.

Compelling, timely and eloquent, this book is beautifully illustrated by master artist Alfonso Ruano who also illustrated The Composition, considered one of the 100 Greatest Books for Kids by Scholastic’s Parent and Child Magazine.


tragictaleofthegreatauk The Tragic Tale of the Great Auk
Written by Jan Thornhill
Publishes October 1st

For hundreds of thousands of years Great Auks thrived in the icy seas of the North Atlantic, bobbing on the waves, diving for fish and struggling up onto rocky shores to mate and hatch their fluffy chicks. But by 1844, not a single one of these magnificent birds was alive.

In this stunningly illustrated non-fiction picture book, award-winning author and illustrator Jan Thornhill tells the tragic story of these birds that “weighed as much as a sack of potatoes and stood as tall as a preteen’s waist.” Their demise came about in part because of their anatomy. They could swim swiftly underwater, but their small wings meant they couldn’t fly and their feet were so far back on their bodies, they couldn’t walk very well. Still the birds managed to escape their predators much of the time … until humans became seafarers.

Great Auks were pursued first by Vikings, then by Inuit, Beothuk and finally European hunters. Their numbers rapidly dwindled. They became collectors’ items — their skins were stuffed for museums, to be displayed along with their beautiful eggs. (There are some amazing stories about these stuffed auks — one was stolen from a German museum during WWII by Russian soldiers; another was flown to Iceland and given a red-carpet welcome at the airport.)

Although undeniably tragic, the final demise of the Great Auk led to the birth of the conservation movement. Laws were eventually passed to prevent the killing of birds during the nesting season, and similar laws were later extended to other wildlife species.

Meet the cast of The King of the Birds!

In The King of the Birds, inspired by the life of Flannery O’Connor, a young fan of fowl brings home a peacock to be the king of her collection, but he refuses to show off his colorful tail. Along the way, we’re introduced to a fine flock of feathered friends. Meet:

the_chicken1

the_chicken2

the_chicken3

the_chicken4

the_duck

the_goose

the_pheasant

the_quail

the_turkey

the_peahen

the_peacock

This picture book was inspired by the life and work of Flannery O’Connor, including her essay “The King of the Birds” (copyright by Flannery O’Connor, copyright renewed by Regina Cline O’Connor. All rights reserved).

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